Medizinische Kurznachrichten der Deutschen Gesellschaft für Endokrinologie
(Prof. Helmut Schatz, Bochum)

Wie soll eine primäre Hypothyreose behandelt werden? Das neue Statement der Britischen Schilddrüsengesellschaft


Bochum, 9. August 2016:

In den erfreulich zahlreichen Kommentaren zu den Blogbeiträgen der DGE über Diagnostik und Therapie der Hypothyreose gab es sehr unterschiedliche Ansichten von Ärzten und Betroffenen (75 Kommentare zum Beitrag vom 7. 9. 2013 oder 26 Kommentare zu dem vom 26. 7.2016). Jetzt hat die Britische Schilddrüsengesellschaft ein Statement zur primären Hypothyreose herausgegeben (1), basierend auf den neuesten Leitlinien der Amerikanischen und der Europäischen Schilddrüsengesellschaft (ATA und ETA), welches von zahlreichen mit der Schilddrüse befassten Fachgesellschaften approbiert wurde. Im Folgenden soll es auszugsweise im Originaltext gebracht werden. Einige Punkte, die in den Kommentaren unserer Leser besonders lebhaft diskutiert wurden, hat der Referent in unterstrichener Kursivschrift hervorgehoben.

Management of Primary Hypothyroidism
Statement by the British Thyroid Association Executive Committee
Clin Endocrinol. 2016; 84(6):799-808

ATA and  ETA Guidelines:

  • L-T4 is the treatment of choice in hypothyroidism. The goal of therapy is to restore physical and psychological well-being and normalize serum TSH.
  • The adequacy of therapy should be determined both by clinical and biochemical assessment, and undertreatment and overtreatment should be avoided due to their detrimental health effects.
  • There is insufficient evidence to recommend monitoring serum T3 as a therapeutic target in hypothyroidism.
  • A proportion of patients on L-T4 therapy have persistent symptoms despite normal serum TSH levels. Such symptoms should be acknowledged and alternative aetiologies sought.
  • There is insufficient evidence that combination therapy with L-T4 and L-T3 therapy is superior to L-T4 monotherapy.
  • L-T4/L-T3 therapy may be considered as an ‚experimental approach‘ in compliant L-T4-treated hypothyroid patients who have persistent complaints despite reference range serum TSH values, provided they have received adequate chronic disease support and associated autoimmune diseases have been ruled out (ETA). There is currently insufficient evidence to support the routine use of such a trial of L-T4 and L-T3 outside a ‚formal clinical trial or N of 1 trial‘ (ATA).
  • Thyroid hormone therapy is not recommended in euthyroid individuals with (i) suggestive symptoms of hypothyroidism, (ii) obesity, (iii) depression or (iv) urticaria .
  • The routine use of thyroid extracts, L-T3 monotherapy, compounded thyroid hormones, iodine containing preparations, dietary supplementation, nutraceuticals and over the counter preparations are not recommended in the management of hypothyroidism.
  • Genetic characterization for deiodinase gene polymorphisms is not recommended as a guide to the use of combination L-T3 and L-T4 therapy in hypothyroidism.
  • Clinicians treating patients with hypothyroidism have an ethical obligation to avoid potential harmful therapies without proven benefits. The balance of clinical evidence regarding the efficacy of monotherapy vs combination therapy calls for further well-designed randomized controlled trials.

Statement of the British Thyroid Association Executive Committee, in line with the best principles of good medical practice and approved by other medical associations (cited in Lit.1):

  1. It is important that high-quality, unbiased, evidence-based information about hypothyroidism is made available to patients and the public. We recognize the need to engage with patients and promote more research in hypothyroidism.
  2. The diagnosis of primary hypothyroidism is based on clinical features of hypothyroidism supported by biochemical evidence that is elevated serum TSH together with low free T4 (overt hypothyroidism) or normal free T4 (subclinical hypothyroidism). Primary hypothyroidism should not be diagnosed in individuals with normal serum TSH who otherwise have intact pituitary function (1/++0).
  3. The evidence in favour of narrowing the serum TSH reference range is not convincing and cannot justify the large increase in the number of healthy people that would require investigation (1/++0).
  4. A significant proportion of healthy subjects in the community have asymptomatic chronic autoimmune thyroiditis and a significant proportion have subclinical hypothyroidism. Spontaneous recovery has been described in subjects with subclinical hypothyroidism. It is more likely in those with negative antithyroid antibodies and serum TSH levels less than 10 mU/l, and within the first 2 years after diagnosis. The higher the serum TSH value, the greater the likelihood of development of overt hypothyroidism in subjects with chronic autoimmune thyroiditis.
  5. Synthetic L-T4 remains the treatment of choice in hypothyroidism with the aim of therapy being to restore physical and psychological well-being while maintaining normal laboratory reference range serum TSH levels (1/++0). After initiation of therapy, TSH should be monitored 6–8 weekly and the dose of L-T4 should be adjusted until a stable TSH is achieved, after which TSH can be checked 4–6 monthly, and then annually (1/+00).
  6. It is acknowledged that a proportion of individuals on L-T4 are not satisfied with therapy and have persistent symptoms despite a normal serum TSH. Such symptoms should be given due consideration and patients should be thoroughly evaluated for other potentially modifiable conditions. In some cases, a retrospective review of the original diagnosis of hypothyroidism may be necessary. Symptom and lifestyle management support should be provided and further dose adjustments may be required (1/+00).
  7. Although fine tuning of serum TSH levels within the reference range may be indicated for individual patients, deliberate serum TSH suppression with high dose thyroid hormone replacement therapy (serum TSH <0·1 mU/L) should be avoided where possible as this carries a risk of adverse effects such as cardiac rhythm disorders including atrial fibrillation, strokes, osteoporosis and fracture (1/++0). As an exception, patients with a history of thyroid cancer may require deliberate suppression of serum TSH if there is a significant risk of recurrence.
  8. For the vast majority of patients on L-T4, brand or named supplier prescribing is not considered necessary (2/+00). The Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) have recently made recommendations to ensure the quality and consistency of L-T4 tablets that are on the UK Rarely, patients may require a specific brand of L-T4 to be prescribed due to intolerance of generic preparations.
  9. Serum T3 should not be used as a therapeutic target in the management of hypothyroidism as the value of this approach is unproven (1/+00).
  10. L-T4/L-T3 combination therapy in patients with hypothyroidism should not be used routinely, as there is insufficient evidence to show that combination therapy is superior to L-T4 monotherapy (1/++0).
  11. Clinicians have an ethical responsibility to adhere to the highest professional standards of good medical practice rooted in sound evidence. This includes not prescribing potentially harmful therapies without proven advantages over existing treatments.
  12. If a decision is made to embark on a trial of L-T4/L-T3 combination therapy in patients who have unambiguously not benefited from L-T4, then this should be reached following an open and balanced discussion of the uncertain benefits, likely risks of over-replacement and lack of long-term safety data. Such patients should be supervised by accredited endocrinologists with documentation of agreement after fully informed and understood discussion of the risks and potential adverse consequences. Many clinicians may not agree that a trial of L-T4/L-T3 combination therapy is warranted in these circumstances and their clinical judgement must be recognized as being valid given the current understanding of the science and evidence of the treatments (2/+00).
  13. The serum TSH reference range in pregnancy is 0·4–2·5 mU/l in the first trimester and 0·4–3·0 mU/l in the second and third trimesters or should be based on the trimester-specific reference range for the population if available. These reference ranges should be achieved where possible with appropriate doses of L-T4 preconception and most importantly in the first trimester (1/++0). L-T4/L-T3 combination therapy is not recommended in pregnancy (1/+00).
  14. There is no convincing evidence to support routine use of thyroid extracts, L-T3 monotherapy, compounded thyroid hormones, iodine containing preparations, dietary supplementation and over the counter preparations in the management of hypothyroidism (1/+00).

Kommentar

In der Originalpublikation (1) sind die in Fragen und die Empfehlungen, mit Quelle (ATA, ETA) und Evidenzgrad angeführt. Diese Arbeit wird gewiss jeder Endokrinologe, insbesondere wenn er sich besonders mit der Schilddrüse beschäftigt, mit Gewinn lesen. Zumeist drückt sie wohl ohnedies seine Meinung aus, aber er kann Argumente finden, wenn manche Patienten anders behandelt werden möchten. Dass eine Hypothyreose nicht immer einfach zu behandeln ist und Normalisierung des Stoffwechsels nicht immer mit Wohlbefinden gleichzusetzen ist, zeigt eine neue dänische Arbeit (2).

Helmut Schatz

Literatur

(1) Onyebuchi Okosieme et al: Management of Primary Hypothyroidism
Statement by the British Thyroid Association Executive Committee
Clin Endocrinol. 2016; 84(6):799-808

(2) Winther KH, Cramon P, Watt T, Bjorner JB, Ekholm O, Feldt-Rasmussen U, et al. Disease-specific as well as generic quality of life is widely impacted in autoimmune hypothyroidism and improves during the first six months of levothyroxine therapy.
PLoS ONE. 2016;11(6):e0156925.

Bitte kommentieren Sie diesen Beitrag !

Publiziert am von Prof. Helmut Schatz
Dieser Beitrag wurde unter Allgemein abgelegt und mit verschlagwortet. Permalink.

9 Antworten auf Wie soll eine primäre Hypothyreose behandelt werden? Das neue Statement der Britischen Schilddrüsengesellschaft

  1. Salk sagt:

    Sehr geehrter Prof. Schatz,

    Dieser Satz
    „Thyroid hormone therapy is not recommended in euthyroid individuals with (i) suggestive symptoms of hypothyroidism, (ii) obesity, (iii) depression or (iv) urticaria .“
    reicht ja schonmal, um unnötige Medikation zu vermeiden. Leider halten sich nur wenig Ärzte daran.

    „The diagnosis of primary hypothyroidism is based on clinical features of hypothyroidism supported by biochemical evidence that is elevated serum TSH together with low free T4 (overt hypothyroidism) or normal free T4 (subclinical hypothyroidism).“

    Die Diagnose wird hier eindeutig definiert erhöhter TSH Wert mit niedrigem fT4. Aufgrund des kritischen 2,5 Wertes bei Kinderwunsch wird derzeit auch schon bei Werten > 2,5 mit Substitution angefangen – vorsichtshalber versteht sich.

    Bei subklinischer Hypothyreose bleiben die ETA und ATA Empfehlungen.
    Vieles spricht auch gegen Symptombehandlung. Das häufig und relevant auftretende Symptom wie bei ETA beschrieben ist die Müdigkeit. Für die Müdigkeit gibt es > 40 Ursachen. Wenn wir als Arzt wegen Symptome Schilddrüsenhormone verschreiben, dann müßten wir bei Jedem, der eventuell an dem Tag schlecht geschlafen oder einer der 40 Ursachen für die Müdigkeit hat , Schilddrüsenpräparate geben.

    Ich finde die 2. Studie noch bedeutender. Keine Verbindung mit Normalisierung des TSH Wertes und des Wohlbefindens. In einigen Kreisen wird nämlich TSH als ein Hormon des Wohlbefindens gesehen.

  2. Diese Leitlinie ist eigentlich eine gut gemachte Zusammenfassung zweier vorhandener Leitlinien der American Thyroid Association (ATA) und der European Thyroid Association (ETA) zur Therapie der Hypothyreose. Es gibt jedoch einige Punkte, die einer Ergänzung, Aktualisierung und mitunter auch Korrektur bedürfen:

    – „A proportion of patients on L-T4 therapy have persistent symptoms despite normal serum TSH levels. Such symptoms should be acknowledged and alternative aetiologies sought.” Es ist erfreulich, dass sich diese Erkenntnis nun in Leitlinien niedergeschlagen hat. Mehrere Studien haben gezeigt, dass etwa 5–15% der von einer Hypothyreose betroffenen Patientinnen und Patienten gesundheitliche Probleme und eine reduzierte Lebensqualität haben, auch dann, wenn eine normale TSH-Konzentration eine Euthyreose unter Substitution suggeriert. Umgerechnet auf die Bevölkerung der Europäischen Union, der Volksrepublik China und der USA sind das etwa 13 Millionen Menschen, die an einem gesundheitlichen Problem leiden, dessen Ätiologie nicht geklärt ist [1]. In der Literatur werden etliche mögliche Gründe für die Entstehung dieses „Syndroms T“ genannt. Zu den von der BTA genannten potentiellen Ursachen (Bewusstsein an einer chronischen Erkrankung zu leiden – Nocebo-Effekt, Komorbidität einer Autoimmunthyreopathie mit anderen Autoimmunerkrankungen, extrathyreoidale Manifestationen einer Schilddrüsenautoimmunität und inadäquate Behandlungsmodalität einer T4-Monotherapie) seien noch eine mögliche peri- oder postmenopausale Situation hypothyreoter Patientinnen im mittleren Lebensalter und eine mögliche inadäquate Behandlungsdosis, die sich nicht am individuellen Sollwert der Schilddrüsenhomöostase ausrichtet, hinzugefügt. Die Lebensqualität kann auch durch ein gleichzeitig vorliegendes Fibromyalgiesyndrom, das sich bei Autoimmunthyreopathien gehäuft findet, eingeschränkt sein. Für weitere Einzelheiten sei auf zwei interessante Übersichtsarbeiten von Wilmar Wiersinga [2] sowie Elizabeth McAninch und Antonio Bianco [3] verwiesen.

    – „Although fine tuning of serum TSH levels within the reference range may be indicated for individual patients…”: Das ist ein wichtiger Punkt, da die intraindividuelle Variation sowohl des TSH-Spiegels [4] als auch der Konzentration peripherer Schilddrüsenhormone [5] wesentlich geringer ist als die intraindividuelle Variabilität. Diese Tatsache resultiert aus der Physiologie der Schilddrüsenhomöostase, die gegen einen Sollwert (set point) reguliert wird [6]. Kürzlich wurde ein Verfahren zur Rekonstruktion des persönlichen Set-Points der Schilddrüsenhomöostase im Falle einer Hypothyreose entwickelt [7-9]. Dieser Algorithmus bildet möglicherweise die Grundlage für eine besser begründete Dosistitration als sie die Ausrichtung an breiten interindividuellen Referenzbereichen oder eine „Trial and Error“-Strategie zum „Fine Tuning“ sein können. Freilich ist das Verfahren noch experimentell, und künftige Studien müssen zeigen, ob sein Einsatz zu einer besseren Lebensqualität führt und wo möglicherweise Grenzen der Anwendbarkeit liegen.

    – „For the vast majority of patients on L-T4, brand or named supplier prescribing is not considered necessary.“ Diese Aussage ist bestenfalls missverständlich, möglicherweise sogar schlichtweg falsch. Schilddrüsenhormone sind „Präparate kritischer Dosierung“, d. h., dass sie eine geringe therapeutische Breite besitzen und dass es multiple Einflussfaktoren auf ihre Pharmakokinetik gibt [10]. Deshalb ist unter Substitution auch ein regelmäßiges Monitoring der Stoffwechsellage notwendig. Studien dies- und jenseits des Atlantiks haben gezeigt, dass sich die Bioverfügbarkeit zwischen verschiedenen Handelspräparaten um mehr als 20% unterscheiden kann. Es ist zwar bei der Ersteinstellung a priori unwichtig, ob ein Generikum oder ein Markenpräparat und ggf. welches verwendet wird, aber bereits auf ein bestimmtes Handelspräparat eingestellte Patientinnen und Patienten sollten nicht umgestellt werden. Die Kosten der durch eine Umstellung notwendigen vermehrten Stoffwechselkontrollen übersteigen die geringfügigen möglichen Einsparungen bei Weitem [10].

    Literatur

    1. Dietrich JW, Midgley JE, Larisch R, Hoermann R 2015 Of rats and men: thyroid homeostasis in rodents and human beings. Lancet Diabetes Endocrinol 3:932-933. doi: 10.1016/S2213-8587(15)00421-0. PubMed PMID: 26590684.
    2. Wiersinga WM. Paradigm shifts in thyroid hormone replacement therapies for hypothyroidism. Nat Rev Endocrinol. 2014 Mar;10(3):164-74. doi: 10.1038/nrendo.2013.258. PubMed PMID: 24419358.

    3. McAninch EA, Bianco AC. New insights into the variable eff ectiveness of levothyroxine monotherapy for hypothyroidism. Lancet Diabetes Endocrinol 2015; 3: 756–58. doi: 10.1016/S2213-8587(15)00325-3. PubMed PMID: 26362364.

    4. Larisch R, Giacobino A, Eckl W, Wahl HG, Midgley JE, Hoermann R. Reference range for thyrotropin. Post hoc assessment. Nuklearmedizin. 2015;54(3):112-7. doi: 10.3413/Nukmed-0671-14-06. PubMed PMID: 25567792.
    5. Andersen S, Pedersen KM, Bruun NH, Laurberg P. Narrow individual variations in serum T(4) and T(3) in normal subjects: a clue to the understanding of subclinical thyroid disease. J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2002 Mar;87(3):1068-72. PubMed PMID: 11889165.

    6. Hoermann R, Midgley JE, Larisch R, Dietrich JW. Homeostatic Control of the Thyroid-Pituitary Axis: Perspectives for Diagnosis and Treatment. Front Endocrinol (Lausanne). 2015 Nov 20;6:177. doi: 10.3389/fendo.2015.00177. PubMed PMID: 26635726; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC4653296.

    7. Goede SL, Leow MK, Smit JW, Dietrich JW. A novel minimal mathematical model of the hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid axis validated for individualized clinical applications. Math Biosci. 2014 Mar;249:1-7. doi: 10.1016/j.mbs.2014.01.001. PubMed PMID: 24480737.

    8. Goede SL, Leow MK, Smit JW, Klein HH, Dietrich JW. Hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid feedback control: implications of mathematicalmodeling and consequences for thyrotropin (TSH) and free thyroxine (FT4) reference ranges. Bull Math Biol. 2014 Jun;76(6):1270-87. doi: 10.1007/s11538-014-9955-5. PubMed PMID: 24789568.

    9. Dietrich JW, Landgrafe-Mende G, Wiora E, Chatzitomaris A, Klein HH, Midgley JE, Hoermann R. Calculated Parameters of Thyroid Homeostasis: Emerging Tools for Differential Diagnosis and Clinical Research. Front Endocrinol (Lausanne). 2016 Jun 9;7:57. doi: 10.3389/fendo.2016.00057. PubMed PMID: 27375554; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC4899439.

    10. Dietrich JW, Brisseau K, Boehm BO. Resorption, Transport und Bioverfügbarkeit von Schilddrüsenhormonen. Dtsch Med Wochenschr. 2008 Aug;133(31-32):1644-8. doi: 10.1055/s-0028-1082780. Review. German. PubMed PMID: 18651367.

  3. Maja5 sagt:

    „L-T4/L-T3 combination therapy in patients with hypothyroidism should not be used routinely, as there is insufficient evidence to show that combination therapy is superior to L-T4 monotherapy (1/++0).“

    Interessanterweise nimmt jetzt ETA Abstand zu vorheriger Empfehlung, die L-T4/L-T3 Kombitherapie, wenn nötig, anzuwenden. Die Erklärung dafür erscheint eher fadenscheinig.

    Würde die o.g. Empfehlung stehen gelassen, würden sich die deutschen Big-Pharma-Unternehmen etwas gescheiteres, als zu hoch für eine Hypothyreose-Behandlung, T3-Präparat, einfallen lassen müssen. Zumal noch ein separates, retardiertes, niedriger, als 20 Mikrogramm dosiertes, Medikament für eine korrekte Therapie unabdingbar ist. Wenn man schon in Richtung USA schielt, dann sollte man auch positive Entwicklungen miteinbeziehen, nicht nur die bequemen. S. retardiertes T3-Präparat. Die Zulassung ist da, interessiert hier ja niemanden. Obwohl es eine revolutionäre Entwicklung ist, die enorme therapeutische Möglichkeiten bietet.
    In Deutschland wird es nicht mal erwähnt.

    Das würde natürlich enorme Entwicklungskosten bedeuten, also – rudert man zurück. Wenn das ein Fortschritt ist…

    Was sollen wir in der nächsten Version der Leitlinien erwarten, wenn es in diese Richtung weitergeht?

    Vielleicht alle, die unter der L-T4-Therapie nicht zufrieden sind, direkt zum Psychiater überweisen, was manche Ärzte schon heute praktizieren, dann hätte sich das komplexe Problem von alleine gelöst und, als Nebeneffekt, die psychiatrische Kliniken würden mehr Gewinne erzielen. Und so hätte man weiter bequem im Sessel sitzen können, mit sich selbst sehr zufrieden und unbequeme Patienten nicht mehr beachten müssen…..da „psychisch gestört“.

    • Ein wenig mehr Genauigkeit im Lesen und ein wenig weniger Voreingenommenheit wären nützlich.

      Die BTA schreibt nicht „L-T4/L-T3 combination therapy in patients with hypothyroidism should not be used“, sie schreibt „L-T4/L-T3 combination therapy in patients with hypothyroidism should not be used routinely“. Das heißt, dass für die Mehrzahl der Patienten L-T4 ausreichen wird. Diese Art der Formulierung schließt aber implizit auch ein, dass es Ausnahmefälle gibt, die doch von einer Kombinationstherapie aus L-T4 und L-T3 profitieren. Wenn Sie die BTA-Leitlinie gelesen haben, dann wissen Sie, dass darin auch die ETA-Leitlinien, welche die Modalität eines Therapieversuchs mit einer Kombinationstherapie beschreiben, zitiert werden.

      Wenn man allen hypothyreoten Patient/inn/en zusätzlich L-T3 gäbe, auch den vielen, die es nicht brauchen, dann würde man sich von einer adäquaten und personalisierten Medizin weit wegbewegen.

  4. Rudolf Hoermann sagt:

    Zitat: „L-T4 is the treatment of choice in hypothyroidism. The goal of therapy is to restore physical and psychological well-being and normalize serum TSH. “
    Es stellt sich die Frage („unter dem Motto Wer heilt hat recht“): Wird das angestrebte Ziel erreicht?
    Die bereits erwähnte umfangreiche Studie einer renommierten dänischen Arbeitsgruppe verneint dies (1). Demnach verbesserte sich die Lebensqualität hypothyreoter Patienten zwar nach der leitliniengemäßen LT4- Therapie, sie wurde aber nicht normalisiert, d.h. ein normales Niveau der gesunden Bevölkerung wird nicht erreicht (1).
    Das passt durchaus zu der variablen biochemischen Antwort nach LT4-Gabe, wie wir sie gesehen haben (2).
    Pathophysiologisch sollte man hervorheben, dass sich unter einer reinen LT4-Therapie eine FT3-TSH-Dissoziation ausbildet und sich insbesondere bei Patienten ohne Restschilddrüse unter LT4-Momotherapie eine FT3-Instabilität einstellen kann (3). Einen Nutzen der FT3-Bestimmung konnten wir (mit einer selbst geeichten Methode), wie auch andere Autoren, an großen Patientenzahlen bestätigen (3).
    Eine T3-Zugabe lässt sich von daher für manche Patienten gut begründen. Vom Sicherherheitsprofil (4) erscheint sie mir eine vertretbare Option, wenn Alternativen fehlen/versagen.
    Die Leitlinien sollten mM klarer ansprechen, was Ärzte und Patienten im Jahre 2016 erwarten können. Ein Erreichen des definierten Eingangsziels erscheint nach Studienlage eher unrealistisch. Somit bleibt die Frage nach positiven und individualisierten Optimierungsansätzen.

    1. Winther KH, Cramon P, Watt T, Bjorner JB, Ekholm O, Feldt-Rasmussen U, et al. Disease-specific as well as generic quality of life is widely impacted in autoimmune hypothyroidism and improves during the first six months of levothyroxine therapy. PLoS ONE. 2016;11(6):e0156925
    2. Midgley JEM, Larisch R, Dietrich JW, Hoermann R. Variation in the biochemical response to L-thyroxine therapy and relationship with peripheral thyroid hormone conversion. Endocr Connect. 2015 Aug 11;4(4):196–205.
    3. Hoermann R, Midgley JEM, Larisch R, Dietrich JW. Homeostatic Control of the Thyroid–Pituitary Axis: Perspectives for Diagnosis and Treatment. Front Endocrinol. Frontiers; 2015 Nov 20;6(6):1–17.
    4. Leese GP, Soto-Pedre E, Donnelly LA. Liothyronine use in a 17 year observational population-based study – The TEARS study. Clin Endocrinol (Oxf). 2016 Mar 4.

    • Ich würde sogar noch weiter gehen und die Normalisierung des TSH-Spiegels als Zielparameter in Frage stellen. Eigentlich ist TSH nur ein Surrogatmarker. Der angebliche loglineare Zusammenhang zwischen FT4 und TSH ist nur eine Vereinfachung, die vielleicht für das eine oder andere praktisch ist, aber sicher in den Extrema nicht mehr gilt und die Versorgung mit T3 natürlich gar nicht berücksichtigt.

      Das relevante Ziel ist das physische und psychische Wohlbefinden. Leider sind die Symptome einer Hypothyreose natürlich mehrdeutig, deshalb braucht man die Surrogatmarker. Man sollte sich aber ihrer Grenzen bewusst sein.

  5. Maja5 sagt:

    Bei so einer komplexen Erkrankung wird die Suche nach einem ultimativem Marker noch Jahrzehnte dauern.

    Zwischen Symptomen und einem Surrogatmarker gibt es noch eine Zwischenlösung, die nicht genug Beachtung bekommt.
    Es gibt unzählige Studien wo jeweilige Korrelationen mit einer Hypothyreose gut erforscht sind. Hier ein Beispiel.

    Biondi B, Fazio S, Palmieri EA, Carella C, Panza N, Cittadini A, Bonè F, Lombardi G, Saccà L. Left ventricular diastolic dysfunction in patients with subclinical hypothyroidism. J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 1999 Jun;84(6):2064-7. PMID 10372711. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10372711

    Dreht man den Spieß um, bedeutet es, daß eine Hypothyreose die Ursache für „Left ventricular diastolic dysfunction“ ist/sein kann, besonders dann, wenn man sonst keine organische Ursache finden mann.

    Man kann doch sehr gut „Left ventricular diastolic dysfunction“ diagnostizieren, schon bevor drastische Symptome auftreten. Bildet sich die Dysfunktion unter der Therapie mit T4, bzw. T4/T3 zurück, hat man die Ursache gefunden. Was noch wichtiger ist, erfolgreich behandelt.

    Schaut man sich gleichzeitig die Entwicklung der Cholesterinwerte, Mißt man Achillessehnenreflex, usw., hat man wieder zusätzliche Diagnosekriteria.

    Ziel der Therapie ist das Wohlbefinden. Das Wohlbefinden ist nur dann zu erreichen, wenn alle Organe und Körpersysteme einwandfrei funktionieren. Nicht vorher. Und dort sollte man bei Diagnostik einer Hypothyreose ansetzen, bis ein ultimativer Surrogatmarker gefunden wird.

    • Ob es je einen ultimativen Surrogatmarker geben wird, ist höchst fraglich. Andererseits ist z. B. auch eine linksventrikuläre diastolische Funktionsstörung alles andere als ein eindeutiges Symptom für eine Hypothyreose. Diastolische Dysfunktionen finden sich z. B. auch bei arterieller Hypertension und Typ-2-Diabetes, anderen Volkskrankheiten.

      • Maja5 sagt:

        Ja, natürlich, isoliert betrachtet. Jedes Hypothyreosesymptom ist für sich mehrdeutig.
        Betrachtet man aber alle gleichzeitig vorhandenen Symptome, bzw. Funktionswerte zusammen, ergibt sich ein typisches Muster. Das Charakteristische dabei ist, daß man keine direkte Ursachen für die Funktionstörungen findet. Das nächste Charakteristikum liegt darin, daß unter der SD-Hormontherapie, korrekt angewendet, normalisieren sich die sonst „unerklärliche“ Störungen. Einen besseren Beweis für die Ursache kann man nicht finden….und: wer heilt, hat Recht. Bin das beste (gut dokumentiert!) Beispiel.

Schreiben Sie einen Kommentar

Ihre E-Mail-Adresse wird nicht veröffentlicht. Erforderliche Felder sind mit * markiert.